Olaf Fafnirsbane: painted and based.

I posted about this guy a month or so back but now he’s finished (well he lost a pauldron so he’s not finished any more, but he was). I took some hobbying things home for Christmas and I ended up painting in bed while I had the flu with occasional help from the dog and the cat. I say help, but there was the terrifying moment when the cat tried to climb on the folding table that I was using for a painting table. I’ve even fielded him in a game where he gained another name “Lord Precarious”.

Olaf Fafnirsbane left

Olaf Fafnirsbane back

I explained how I built him in the previous post. I painted him in my usual manner: base/layer, wash and then highlights.

Olaf Fafnirsbane front

On his face I decided to add a couple of tattoos to stop him looking quite so much like a surfer as he did at certain points in the painting.

Olaf Fafnirsbane face

So there you go, it’s a short post, but there isn’t much to say. Oh, and in that game… he got toasted by Flamers very quickly!

L.o.F.

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On the twelfth day of Christmas the hobby meant to me…

Twelve Space Wolf Great Companies…

So this is the last post in this series, normal service will shortly be resumed. This post took longer than I expected, sorry. The reason why will, hopefully, become clear soon enough.

Today I want to talk about my army. The picture below describes my army as it is. I’ve arranged it mostly in the same way as the Force Org although you may notice that there are four Heavy Support slots drawn in. That is because I have a Land Raider to paint one of these days as well as another pack of Long Fangs.

Great company coloured

My Wolves are part of the Great Company of Ælthere Greatpaw. I wanted to give my guys a Viking raider feel, so I’m going for lots of Fast Attack in the form of Swiftclaws, Land Speeders and Fenrisian Wolves, although I’m not impressed with the Landspeeder so far. The bikes are cheaper and survive a little bit longer (if more by luck than any special ability). I don’t like Thunderwolf Cavalry, don’t ask me why, I just don’t, so I’m avoiding them.

I have three HQ choices at the moment and I’m not planning on any more for now. As well as Greatpaw himself, who is a Wolf Lord in Terminator armour, I have Alvaldi Ratatosk, the Rune Priest, and Hildólfr Deathmask, the Wolf Priest. I actually have two models of Deathmask, one in Terminator Armour and one on a bike, as I wanted a more mobile HQ choice to go with my Swiftclaws.

Oddly enough, although this is Greatpaw’s Company, he’s the one guy for which I have least fluff (beyond the fact that I imagine him with a broad Yorkshire accent. My imagination is weird some days). Deathmask though is explained in detail in two posts here! The symbolism on Ratatosk is mentioned in my original post on him. I like trying to add symbolism to my figures. I find that it helps me to paint them if I have a sketchy idea of name and personality. Sometimes this personality doesn’t develop until I paint them (I have a Blood Claw with an axe who looks like he hasn’t had an original idea in his life), sometimes it never develops at all, but I find that a model with a sketchy back story gets painted far more quickly than one without. Oddly enough I forget all about this as soon as I field them in a game!

For Elites I currently have Wolf Guard Terminators (three for now, but hopefully more will follow in time) and a mixed bunch of Wolf Scouts. In future I’ll be adding a Dreadnought to the list, but he’s still in his box and desperately needs assembling and painting. I like Dreadnoughts, I’m just not sure how I want to build this one though.

My troops slot still has plenty of room to expand. I currently split the ten man packs into two but what I really need to do is build more. I’m working on it, honestly! The Space Wolf Pack boxes are almost too detailed. It takes a long time to paint each guy properly and that makes painting new Grey Hunter and Blood Claw packs a little bit off-putting.

I’m still building up my Heavy Support choices too. I have one complete pack of Long Fangs and another partly painted pack. The rest are in need of assembly and my Land Raider needs painting. It’s just a little bit daunting! I’m also a little bit nervous about putting too many points into this slot as my Long Fangs have seen very little action so far.

Anyway, that’s the last of this series. I hope that you enjoyed them. I’ll be back to my usual schedule (hopefully) on Tuesday. I have plenty of non-numericially themed posts waiting!

L.o.F.

…Eleven months of blogging…

…Ten thousand years past…

…Nine different tools…

…Eight books to look at…

…Seven days of hobbying…

… Learning sixth edition…

…Fifth Edition!…

…Four more excuses…

…Three things to think of…

Two different opinions

And a gift under the Christmas Tree

On the eleventh day of Christmas the hobby meant to me…

Eleven months of blogging…

It’s been about eleven months since I started this blog. It’s been fun, for me at least, and I think that I’ve learned a lot. I’ve certainly learned that blogging is harder than it looks and that posting in time is fiendishly hard some days (as is evident in that this is a Christmas post and it’s now mid January).

I’ve only got two more “Christmas” posts to go and I really want to get them finished as I have a lot to talk about that can’t be covered in a numerically themed series. I’ve been modelling, reading and, wait for it, even gaming in the past month. I’ll start talking about all that soon, I promise. For now, I need to finish this post and do a little bit of work towards the twelfth and final post in this series.

L.oF.

Ten thousand years past…

…Nine different tools…

…Eight books to look at…

…Seven days of hobbying…

… Learning sixth edition…

…Fifth Edition!…

…Four more excuses…

…Three things to think of…

Two different opinions

And a gift under the Christmas Tree

On the tenth day of Christmas the hobby meant to me…

Ten thousand years past…

So, the Horus Heresy. It’s quite important to me as a hobbyist as it’s part of how I got interested in 40 (and 30) K. Therefore, when they announced that Forgeworld were releasing rules and models for the Heresy I was quite excited. Or at least I was until I saw the price! I can afford Betrayal, I just find that I don’t need a shiny, shiny book that costs quite that much, particularly as it covers such a tiny part (time wise not importance wise of course) of the Heresy.

Forgeworld is obviously on to a money maker here, and I know that what they produce is and will be spectacular, and I don’t begrudge them, or anybody who plays the game, a single little bit of it, it’s just that I caught myself working out what potential models there were in Angel Exterminatus the other evening (yes, I did fork out for the hardcover in the end) and I found that it was beginning to spoil the book for me.

Of course, whenever they get round to releasing rules and models for the Battle of Prospero I will probably cave in and, even if I don’t buy the rules, buy any pretty Space wolf models or upgrades that they happen to produce! I imagine that it won’t be for a while though, so my wallet’s (relatively) safe for now!

L.o.F.

 

…Nine different tools…

…Eight books to look at…

…Seven days of hobbying…

… Learning sixth edition…

…Fifth Edition!…

…Four more excuses…

…Three things to think of…

Two different opinions

And a gift under the Christmas Tree

On the ninth day of Christmas the hobby meant to me…

Nine different tools…

Yes, I know that I should have posted this well over a week ago, I got distracted, sorry!

Anyway, today’s post is going to be about tools, namely the tools that I use for modelling. I’ve not included paintbrushes in the list as I don’t use particularly good brushes and I decided to focus on the tools I use for building and converting miniatures.

tools

 1. Clippers

These are actually our second set. When my boyfriend got back into the hobby he bought a set of modelling tools off the internet including a set of plastic clippers. Unfortunately they did not survive me, so I had to buy a new set from Games Workshop. Their tools tend to be a little bit overpriced but the quality is fairly good and I did not have to wait weeks for an internet order to arrive to get them which is a definite bonus when you’re in the middle of a project.

 2. Files

These were part of my boyfriend’s initial set of tools (and still are, I’m only borrowing them, honest). I use the triangular file for most things, but the round one is very useful for gun barrels etc.. I also use, but haven’t included in the picture, finishing abrasives, particularly when I want to smooth down green stuff. The files came from Army Painter originally I think. They’re a must for smoothing edges and removing mould lines. I also use them to shave down surfaces so that I can adjust the pose of a model better.

 3. Tweezers

Another Army Painter purchase, but tweezers are fairly easy to get hold of from craft shops. You can even use the ones from the chemist, but craft ones have better ends to them for modelling purposes.

 4. Razor Saw

Vital if, like me, you chop up models in order to convert them. Clamp the model down first (see 5) and make sure that you cut a guide line in first before you really start sawing.

 5. Vice

This one has a suction pad to hold it to the table (usually). Using a vice means that you can hold a model still particularly if you are cutting or drilling. Some sort of clamp is vital if you plan to do a lot of converting or drill out the barrels on any weapons.

 6. Drill bits

The smallest drill bit in the picture is 1mm in diameter and I use it for drilling out the barrels on my bolt pistols. I use larger ones for bigger gun barrels, for drilling out holes for pinning rods or wires and for removing traces of weapon grips from hands. A pin vice can be used to hold the drill bit in place but I tend to just use the bits loose as I mostly work with plastic.

 7. Scalpel

These are fairly easy to get hold of. I use mine for removing difficult or delicate parts from the sprue, shaving off mould lines, cutting any bits that are too small or awkward for the razor saw, and cutting and shaping green stuff.

 8. Clay tool (scraper?)

I don’t know what this is called and the art shop where I bought it doesn’t have a website. I think that it’s called a clay scraper or kidney. It is very, very useful though. I use it to get a smooth surface on green stuff. I have to use a lot of Vaseline on the tool otherwise it sticks, but I can use it to smooth down flat surfaces such as cloaks and banners. By flattening the green stuff crudely with a flat edged tool or using my scalpel as a rolling pin, I can then smooth green stuff out until it is thinner than 1mm using this tool.

 9. Shaping tools.

These come from a variety of places. The one on the left comes from Games Workshop, the three in the middle come from Army Painter and the one on the right is an embossing tool from a craft shop. They all have roughly the same role though, moulding and cutting and manipulating green stuff.

Anyway, these are most of the tools I use in order to make my figures, the most important ones anyway. Happy converting!

L.o.F.

…Eight books to look at…

…Seven days of hobbying…

… Learning sixth edition…

…Fifth Edition!…

…Four more excuses…

…Three things to think of…

Two different opinions

And a gift under the Christmas Tree

On the eighth day of Christmas the hobby meant to me…

Eight books to look at…

Hi,

Sorry that I missed yesterday’s post, but here it is now. I was thinking about what less usual books and websites and things might be of interest to 40k players. Here are eight assorted books, websites and poems, some directly 40k related, some not, that are possibly of interest. There’s no particular order to the items, but below each item, I’ve tried to explain why I think that they may be of use or interest.

 1) The first Horus Heresy trilogy: Horus Rising, False Gods, Galaxy in Flames

I know, I know, they’re rather obvious, but the Horus Heresy books are a big part of how I got into the hobby and, if you haven’t read or listened to the audio versions of these, you’re missing out on some cracking fiction!

2) Deathwing

I know that I reviewed this the other week, but it does contrast well with the Horus Heresy books in that it’s some of the earliest 40k fiction out there. As somebody fairly new to the whole 40k universe it’s interesting to see how things have changed.

3) Dark Angel by Lionel Johnson

If you haven’t read the actual Dark Angel poem by Lionel Johnson, you should. I have to admit that it’s not really to my taste, but it gives you something to think about regarding the nature of the Dark Angels. Especially as despite Gav Thorpe managing to add some sort of personality to El’Jonson the primarch beyond a massive ego and and even bigger capacity for jealousy in The Lion, I still find it very hard to like the character!

4) The Hornblower books (CS Forester)

Long, long before I had ever heard about Games Workshop and 40k, I was reading the Hornblower books. CS Forester did create some rather odd characters, but the books are good and they’re certainly grim and dark in places.

 5) The Spanish Bride by Georgette Heyer

Wait a moment! This book is not what it looks like. Georgette Heyer is best known for Regency romances, yes, but this book is a meticulously researched account of the Napoleonic Wars, in particular the Peninsular War and Waterloo, from the point of view of an officer and his wife. The book is based on two real characters and it does not stint on describing all the horrors of war. If you are thinking about giving a Guard list some Napoleonic charm, I’d really consider reading this first.

 6) Celtic Design Coloring Book by Ed Sibbett Jr.

Another odd one I guess. However, I like to add freehand work to my Wolves and, while there are some differences between Insular art and Viking art, they are close enough that I happily use Insular, or Celtic, art such as that found in this book, as an inspiration.. I’ve had this book for years and I dug it out of my bookcase at home this Christmas and I’m taking it back with me when I return to The Netherlands this weekend. It’s a really good source of images, and as it’s a colouring book, the designs are clear and easy to follow.

 7) Wikipedia

I know, this isn’t a book at all, it’s not even one thing, but, if you want cool names or help with a nice bit of fluff, there are worse places to go. I play Space Wolves, which have a wolfy, Vikingy feel and live on an Arctic like deathworld. If I want inspiration I search round these areas on Wikipedia. If I were playing Raven Guard I might look up ravens or other corvids. If I were playing WW2 themed guard I might look up Operation Market Garden, the Eastern Front or the Chindits. It’s a big place, so go and explore

 8) The blogosphere

There are many, many good 40K, Games Workshop and even more general hobby blogs out there and they are a brilliant source of inspiration. Just go and look!

I hope that this has inspired you!

L.o.F.

…Seven days of hobbying…

… Learning sixth edition…

…Fifth Edition!…

…Four more excuses…

…Three things to think of…

Two different opinions

And a gift under the Christmas Tree

On the seventh day of Christmas the hobby meant to me…

Seven days of hobbying…

So, my hobbying week can usually be divided into two: the week and the weekend. During the week I tend to work for a bit after work. Sometimes I’m too tired to do anything, sometimes I can get an hour or two of painting in. I don’t tend to do any model building and converting during the week, I save that for the weekend, when I have more time. During the weekend I can do more painting. It’s also the only time that I have available that my local Games Workshop or the toy shop in my city are open to buy things.

I try to write my blog posts in advance or at least try to get them written on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. Obviously I frequently miss the deadline and end up posting in the morning before work, or a day later. It’s often difficult to find things to post about, particularly if I haven’t been particularly productive, or I’m in the middle of a big project.

While I tend to do any converting during the weekend I tend to come up with ideas when and wherever I have a spare moment. The difficult bit is saving them for the weekend. I have been known to start cutting out parts at inappropriate times though!

I have a few things planned for the new year, both with my Wolves and for a couple of side projects. Hopefully I can get everything coordinated nicely.

L.o.F.

… Learning sixth edition…

…Fifth Edition!…

…Four more excuses…

…Three things to think of…

Two different opinions

And a gift under the Christmas Tree