A Painting Schedule (for once)

Right, I’m getting annoyed with myself. I post something, feel good about it, think: “Right, now it’s time to get back on schedule!” and then procrastinate. So, taking inspiration from my boyfriend (you’ve read his blog over at Red Squig Racing haven’t you?) and set myself goals for my hobbying. There are three main areas right now:

1) Exodite Eldar

guardian_terradon

I have been making a fair bit of progress recently (for me at least). I bought some Terradon Riders/Ripperdactyls for some Guardian “Jet” Bikers. The Lizardman kit is great, straightforward to put together and with plenty of extra bits. It also fits well with the Helion legs that I had in my bits box (well, chest). One is finished, save for a base, the others are in the progress of being painted. I have another three dinosaur riders to finish too. One “Shining Spear” is in the progress of being painted, as is an Autarch on “Jet Bike”. The other dinosaur riding “Shining Spear” is still in bits. My current plan is to finish the models that are in progress of being painted before working on the last unpainted guy although I don’t know how much I’ll get done this week as I have things that take priority this week (see 2 and 3). 

2) Space Wolves

longfang_box

First up, I need to really learn the new ‘dex and explore what lists I want to build. I need to remind myself of all the special rules and point changes and learn how to coordinate everything. Fortunately, the feel of the new ‘dex is not wildly different to the old, and, after months of not knowing what to do, I’m picking up Space Wolf sprues again and planning things! I bought a box of very old Long Fangs last autumn and I’m going to strip the two that need the old paint removed and paint the lot up. This week I want them stripped of any old paint and prepared for painting. I’m also going to build another Swift Claw and basecoat him too.

3) Daemons

fiend

I’m building and painting these Fiend conversions for my boyfriend. One’s done and there are three to go. He wants them back so I need to work on them. In particular he wants at least three of them ready in time for the Overlords’ Haven event in two weeks, so I really need to get cracking! These are my priority as I should be able to get them to tabletop standard (if not finished) fairly quickly.

 

Anyhow, by next week I want to have a post up showing at least one finished model! Hopefully I can find something else to post about too. Until then!

L.o.F.

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Space Wolves Codex 2014: a first impressions review

Well, the new Space Wolves codex came out on Saturday and I quite like it. I was scared for a little bit that my WYSIWYG Grey Hunters were now WYSIWYUTG (What You See Is What You Used To Get) but I think that the way that they are now is only fair.

rune_priest_front

Rune priests have been downgraded slightly but are cheap enough that it doesn’t matter any more. We’ve lost the chance for 4 HQs in a standard detachment but I think that we’ll still see a lot of pyskers coming from Fenris. The new Tempestus discipline looks fun and I’ve got my Living Lighting back (as the Primaris power too) so I think I’ll be using it. The way that the Rune Priest has been changed means that you can build him up to being something like the old Rune Priest if you wanted to although I’m sure some of the more competitive players will still be bemoaning the changes to Jaws. He’s lost the Chooser of the Slain which is a pity as it was fairly colourful

crozius

Moving on to the other HQ that I regularly use, I find that the Wolf Priest is slightly more expensive, although the combination that I use (on a bike) is slightly cheaper. I’m not sure why it got an increase while other HQs got a decrease but for me, he seems perfectly ok and I will carry on using him. My boyfriend commented that Oath of War was rather good until I pointed out that the Wolf Priest has always had it- I just keep forgetting to use it.

The Wolf Lord has also gone up by a mighty 5 points, although he now comes with the previously 25 point Belt of Russ as standard, so compared to the old equivalent Wolf Lord he’s cheaper, as are the Fenrisian Wolf escorts that he can take. The real bargain of the month though is the Wolf Guard Battle Leader who has dropped a whole twenty points without losing anything. I reckon that he’d make a good HQ for a cheap allied detachment if you want say, drop pods or the benefits of the new Wolf Standard, although the Rune Priest is only ten points more.

??????????I’m not going to go into the special characters, I tend to forget that they’re there most of the time and so I haven’t paid them as much attention as I have to the rest of the book, so having looked at HQs I’m going back to troops as they’re next in the book. My main thought so far is that I need to build some more Blood Claws, the much needed drop is points cost means that I can use a small squad or two in my back field to keep an eye on objectives and the loss of Headstrong (yesss!!!) means that I won’t have to worry about them having to charge any enemy that comes near. What I really think I’ll do with them, when I’m ready, is load a large squad into a Stormwolf, giving me a flyer as a dedicated transport (freeing up a fast attack slot) and a whole blob of 3+ saves to harass the enemy in their own territory. Actually, it’s the loss of headstrong more than the drop in points that really make Bloodclaw’s a more desirable option. It wasn’t worth the risk before.

standard bearer faceGrey Hunters were the core of my army in the old ‘dex and I see no reason why they won’t remain so now. The basic Grey Hunter has dropped a point but lost his extra weapon. However, he can get it back for 2 points and this little points increase is only fair, considering that Grey Hunters were most definitely under-costed before. It seems that they’ve given up trying to make everything a nice round number in this book, which is a relief, as I’d rather use a calculator than have a points imbalance (either way). The Wolf Standard has gone up a lot which at first glance seems rather steep. However its role has changed considerably. It used to allow rerolls of a 1 for one unit in one assault phase, however it now gives re-rolls on pinning and morale checks with 12” as well as +1 attack within 6”- all game and for any member of the Space Wolves faction in that area, which I think is possibly more useful if less tactical. I may drag it out for my next game against the other half’s Orks to see how it does as I wouldn’t mind Grey Hunters with four attacks each in melee against Orks (sorry sweetie).

Wolf scout frontThen I’m onto Elites, I’ve never used an Iron Priest as my army is currently very vehicle light, so I’ll skip both them and the servitors and go on to Wolf Scouts. I’ve just started playing with these again having realised that infiltrating a bunch of guys with sniper rifles to a point where they can harass the enemy the most, is very good. They’ve gone down a point (which is good) and they can now get camo cloaks, so those natty bits of fashion sported by all the most discerning sniper scouts, now have a use. They’ve lost “Behind Enemy Lines” but that wasn’t really much use after 5th. They can also take Flakk. I can really see these guys staying in my new lists.

I haven’t used a Lone Wolf very often, they’re fun but I’d rather take other things. However, they have their nice points (just look at all their special rules) and you can take advantage of being able to take one for each troop or Wolf Guard type unit without taking up a force org. slot.

Next up are Dreadnoughts which I currently don’t use, I was given a kit for my birthday a couple of years back but haven’t dared build it because I love the idea but can’t settle on a loadout. I’m going to pick up the new Space Wolves Venerable Dreadnought and combine two kits to get the most out of all the new stuff. I like new Bjorn and I thibk I quite like the idea of Murderfang. If Blood Angels Dreadnoughts can fall to the Black Rage then it makes sense for Space Wolf Dreadnoughts to fall to the curse of the Wulfen.

What are you looking at?Then we come to Wolf Guard who have been split into two units, standard WG and Terminators. The basic Wolf Guard costs the same as before and has the same stat line and loadout. The nice thing here is that jump packs and bikes are now ridiculously cheap! They’ve dropped from 25 and 35 points to 3 and 7 points respectively. I like my Swiftclaws but they may get promoted!Terminators seem about the same, except that they can now deep strike. I know that Russ liked to fight on his own two feet but his elite warriors can’t seem to wait to get stuck into the action. I like a mobile list and I really should think about building more Wolf Guard! It’s only a pity that splitting the unit in two means that its harder to mix and match armour. You have to have a full squad of both (or attach guys to units) if you do.

Olaf Fafnirsbane frontOn to fast attack and Swiftclaws. I liked these guys before and I like them even better now that they’re five points cheaper, and with both Siftclaws and Skyclaws losing Headstrong, they’re far more versatile (I don’t have to babysit them).

Then there are a bunch of vehicles. In my last game I felt that I needed more mobility for my Grey Hunters so I’ll have to pay some attention to this section in future (but not yet, not unless I’m planning to write another very late post). One curious thing is that the drop pod is now a fast attack choice not just a dedicated transport which I imagine will lead to some interesting shenanigans among more competitive players. The Stormwolf is also here and I’m probably going to invest in one of these in future (see Bloodclaws).

My old bugbear Thunderwolf cavalry are cheaper (there’s a theme here). They’re nice looking models with good rules but I think that they’re a wee bit silly (sorry). I do use Fenrisian Wolves occasionally and they’re the same as last time except that Supernumerary seems to have gone so they can potentially claim objectives, at least until the next FAQ. Yes, I am planning to take advantage of this, why wouldn’t I? I like my plastic puppies and I regret that I leave them in their case most of the time.

Land Speeders are well, Land Speeders, the same as always, there are more exciting things to spend points on.

curved fang frontHaving gone through the fairly busy Fast Attack section, we come to the Heavy Support. I mentioned the Stormfang in my last post and, obviously, nothing’s changed since then and I haven’t really had time to consider it properly yet. Long Fangs are more interesting to me right now (as I have quite a few of them) and they’ve got Flakk at last! Save for that, the only real difference is that they take Split Fire instead of the old book special rule. In 6th this might have been annoying but Split Fire is slightly better in 7th and it means that the Long Fang Ancient can now do something beyond direct traffic and catch bullets!

I’m afraid I’m not going to go into the rest of the Heavy Support section as they’re all tanks and I’m not so interested in them (again sorry). The last thing to look at is Logan Grimnar who is now a Lord of War in his shiny new sledge (which I actually quite like). Lords of War are here to stay though I’m curious why Grimnar was “promoted” and I wonder what this means for Dante, Draigo and Marneus Calgar in future books.

OK, having spent far too long rambling about units I should talk about the book itself which is up to the standard of all the hardback codices that I’ve read so far. It’s nice seeing everything in full colour and some of the old pictures are now clearer. The guy on the cover is just plain awesome! He’s far too good looking to be a Space Marine! Its a lovely looking book with both old favourites and some stunning new artwork. Its clearly set out and written well enough to keep the fluff bunny in me happy. I find the new layouts used for the entries much easier to manage than in the older books as there is far less flicking back and forth looking for rules and points and fluff. As someone who loses and forgets things far, far too frequently, it’s a good thing. Some of the photography could be a little clearer, I’m not too sure about the “artistic” styling, when I’m figuring out a new model I like nice clear photos for inspiration and these well, aren’t!

Anyhow, overall I like the new book. I viewed a new Space Wolves codex with some trepidation as the old book was good and had aged well but it looks like this new one is up to scratch and is likely to remain a strong  ‘dex for some time to come. The core units are still solid (if not more so) and there is enough flexibility for players to be able to adapt to new situations with as much (or as little) fluff as they wish to add. It’s a pity to lose a few little flavourful things such as the talismans, sagas (although they’re not gone entirely) and Mark of the Wulfen but the army as a whole has kept its flavour and I like it.

Anyhow, that’s enough of this first, not too serious review. Next up for me is to build a few lists. I’ll let you know how I get on!

L.o.F.

Is it a wolf? Is it a boat?…

…No, it’s the new Space Wolves flyer!

I was very disappointed when flyers were first released that the Space Wolves lost out, I was even more frustrated when they had dog-fighting rules in Death from the Skies and nothing (save for pricey and exotic Forgeworld goodies) to use them with, but now at last, we have something and I’m not sure what to make of it.

First up, as you’ll probably all have read by now there are two variants, the Stormfang gunship and the Stormwolf Assault craft. I guess they needed to get “fang” and “wolf” in there somewhere. I think, at least to begin with I like the idea of the Stormwolf betterjust because of its ability to disgorge a whole large mob of Blood Claws into the thick of the action. Looking at Stormclaw (which I’m going to do, honest, this just got into the way first), it looks as if Blood Claws might be getting considerably cheaper and a little more reliable in the near future. If this is the case, I think I may build a few more of them so that I can try this out. The Stormfang looks as if it has a bit of punch and toughness, even if it is fairly short range. I guess that it’s fairly Space Wolfy in its lack of subtlety, it’s a stonking great, ugly bit of trouble looking for a flight. As for how good the new flyers really are, I think that will have to wait until the codex is released so that I can compare them with the other options in the codex. For instance, as it is we don’t know if either of them are a dedicated transport, the Stormwolf looks as if it’s set up to be a Blood Claw school bus but we won’t know for sure until the book is out.

Eventually I will probably want to add at least one of these craft to my army, if only so that I can annoy my boyfriend’s Dakkajet, however I am going to wait a little bit before I buy one as they are fairly pricey and I have a feeling (which I’ll expand upon in my nextish post) that I’m going to have to rebuild a large chunk of my army when the book comes out.

In the next few days I’m going to take a look at the Stormclaw box, I know that it’s been out a week but I’ve only just seen it. Until then!

L.o.F.

How to paint Space Wolves: part 2

Space Wolf Panorama: A mixture of models from my newest to some of my oldest.

Space Wolf Panorama: A mixture of models from my newest to some of my oldest.

So, after all the preamble in the previous post, here’s how I paint my Wolves. The colour key is in the previous post.

 Stage 1: Basic colours
I start by painting the armour SW Mix. The concertinaed areas at the back of the knees, thigh joints etc. are coloured Eshin Grey. Bare skin and the backside of furs are painted Bugman’s Glow. Areas that will be painted gold or brass are painted with Tausept Ochre, yellow areas are painted with Iyanden Darksun and red areas are painted Mechrite Red. Bone areas (skulls, fangs, purity seals) are undercoated Ceramite White. Leather areas are painted Scorched Brown. My cabling colour scheme doesn’t completely work with the new paints as they got rid of Mechrite Red and I use that along with Fenris Grey and Caliban Green for any piping. Silver areas are painted with Boltgun Metal.

 Stage 2: Next Layer
Skin is painted with Elf Flesh, red areas painted with Red Gore (weapon grips, purity seals, fabric/chords) or Blood Red (armour), yellow areas are painted with Yriel Yellow. For yellows you need to do several thin coats in order to get a smooth colour. Brass areas are painted with Dwarf Bronze and gold areas are painted Shining Gold.

Stage 3: Freehand
For large bits of freehand I really recommend planning in advance (shoulder pads for instance). For tattoos I tend to go with the flow and see what I can come up with. I like to paint freehand before highlighting as it is easier to correct mistakes. However, this can also disrupt the highlighting process a little as you have to paint round the details.

At this point my guys tend to look like this:

before washing

Stage 4: Washes
The new washes tend to stick a bit more to the models. I don’t mind this so much as it makes armour in particular a little bit dark and dirty. If you want to dilute it use a bit of Lahmian Medium as well as water as that improves the flow a bit.

For skin I use Ogryn flesh
For hair it depends on the shade. I usually use either Gryphonne Sepia or Badab Black
For bone, fangs, parchment, back of furs etc., I use Gryphonne Speia
For armour I start with a layer of Deneb Mud and then follow it up with a layer of Badab Black.

The models then look something like this:

after washing

Stage 5: Highlights
Oddly enough, I don’t highlight my Wolves quite as much or use such a complicated scheme as I use for my newer models. It’s mostly because I’m trying to have a vaguely coherent army and I started highlighting with my second set of guys and while I hope that my technique has evolved, I’d like to have an army that more or less looks the same.

For armour I highlight with Space Wolves Grey. I line highlight along any edges and panelling and then add other highlights where it looks like light will fall. For bone areas I start with Bleached Bone (the Gryphonne Sepia really does change the colour that much!) and then extreme highlight with a touch of skull white. Yellow areas are highlighted with YY+W while red areas are highlighted up in the order (BR+RG, Blood Red,) TSO+BR, Troll Slayer Orange. Brass areas are highlighted with shining gold, while golden areas are highlighted with Burnished Gold. Silvery coloured metals are highlighted with chainmail and then the “sharp” edges are highlighted with Mithril Silver. With the piping I highlight Mechrite Red with Blood Red, Fenris Grey with Hawk Turquoise and Caliban Green with Warpstone Glow.

??????????

Stage 6: Glazes
For the power axe I used a Guilliman Blue glaze before adding the sparks with Hawk Turquoise, Ice Blue and Space Wolves Grey. For the heat damage on the flamer I used Lamenters Yellow followed by a final coat of Gryphonne Sepia.

??????????

Furs
I’ve separated hair and fur from the rest of the instruction as I tend to deviate a lot here from model to model.

I usually paint furs grey or cream but it’s easy to mix and match these and the same idea can be used on other colours. I usually go

Eshin Grey -> Nuln Oil -> Codex Grey -> Celestra Grey

Bleached Bone -> Gryphonne Sepia -> Bleached Bone -> Skull White

Start with the darkest colour and wash it, then highlight the spiky bits of the fur with the second colour. Use the final colour for extreme highlights. If you want to add patches of different coloured fur simply move one shade darker or lighter for the starting colour.

 Hair
I’m only showing one guy with hair here. The process I use is: base colour, wash, highlights. I start with a colour very close to the base colour and blend colours together until I get to a very light highlight colour.

For the Blood Claw I went: Trollslayer Orange-> Gryphonne Sepia-> YY+TSO-> Golden Yellow-> YY+W

For Grey Hair I start with Codex Grey and work my way up to Skull White.

With hair I highlight as the hair moves, using the lightest colour on the tips and on anything that really stands out (sorry if that doesn’t make enough sense)

So, that’s how I paint Space Wolves. Sorry for the delay, I had camera problems. I just hope that this helps somebody!

L.o.F.

How to paint Space Wolves part 1: Background

(or rather “How I paint Space Wolves”)

A while back I promised in the comments that I’d try to explain how I paint Space Wolves. Being me, I then got painter’s block (if there’s such a thing) regarding anything blue-grey! Anyway, better late than never, I guess. I’m breaking this up into two posts partly because it’s got a bit too long and partly because my camera seems to be on its way out and I’ve tried and failed to take the final set of pictures twice already in bright sunshine and with flash and every time they’ve come out far too dark. So by splitting the post up I have a chance to see if I can get a better result with my boyfriend’s camera! In this post I’ll go over what paints I use and a few of the tricks and in the next post I’ll go through how I paint the Space Wolves themselves.

I’m in the process of swapping across to the new Citadel paints, so in some cases I’m using old paints. Some of the new paints are not identical to the paints they replace (I’m still mourning the loss of Mechrite Red) so I’d check colours before you start.  Games Workshop have a conversion chart available as a PDF on their website. Where I’ve used the old Citadel Paints I’ve put the new name in brackets in the paint list below (and yes, I use far too many!). That said, this is how I paint Space Wolves, it’s not like there are any hard and fast rules, if anything this is intended to be a guide to creating your own paint scheme. I also mix some of my own paints. To save time, I’ve given these mixed paints names in the paint key.

The paints used are:

Blues and Blue Greys
Fenris Grey (The Fang)
Shadow Grey (The Fang)
SW Mix = 1:1 Shadow Grey to Space Wolves Grey
Space Wolves Grey (Fenrisian Grey)
Hawk Turquoise (Sotek Green)
Ice Blue (Lothern Blue)

Greens
Caliban Green
Warpstone Glow

Blacks to Whites
Chaos Black (Abaddon Black)
Eshin Grey
Codex Grey (Dawnstone)
Celestra Grey
Bleached Bone (Ushabti Bone)
Skull White (White Scar)
Ceramite White

Reds to Yellows
Mechrite Red (Mephiston Red)
Red Gore (Wazdakka Red)
BR+RG = 1:1 Blood Red to Red Gore
Blood Red (Evil Sunz Scarlet)
TSO+BR = 1:1 Troll Slayer Orange to Blood Red
Troll Slayer Orange
YY+TSO = 1:1 Yriel Yellow to Troll Slayer Orange
Iyanden Darksun (Averland Sunset)
Yriel Yellow
YY+W = 1:1 Yriel Yellow to Skull White

Browns and Flesh
Scorched Brown (Mournfang Brown)
Snakebite Leather (Balor Brown)
Tausept Ochre (XV-88 or Tau Light Ochre or Balor Brown)
Bugman’s Glow
Elf Flesh (Kislev Flesh)

Metallics
Dwarf Bronze (Hashut Copper)
Shining Gold (Gehenna’s Gold)
Burnished Gold (Auric Armour Gold)
Boltgun Metal (Leadbelcher)
Chainmail (Ironbreaker)
Mithril Silver (Runefang Silver)

Washes
Badab Black
Deneb Mud (Agrax Earthshade)
Gryphonne Sepia (Seraphim Sepia)
Ogryn Flesh (Reikland Fleshshade)

Glazes
Guilliman Blue
Lamenters Yellow

Mixing your own paints

I like to mix paints to get the particular colour that I want or build up highlights. For small quantities I mix paints directly on my palette, but for larger quantities I make up my own pots. I save my empty paint pots and use a syringe to measure out paint in the right ratio. I then make sure the lid is tightly closed and then skip round the house shaking the pot in order to mix them together.

Highlighting

I use line highlights a lot. My Space Wolves are probably not the best example on how to use them as they were originally started before I knew what line highlights actually were, so I have had to rein back my enthusiasm to try and keep the army vaguely consistent.

In general to line highlight, I start, after washing, with the original colour (Citadel shades and the old washes do change the base colour slightly), then I work through a series of colours starting with a 50:50 blend of the base colour and next lightest paint, followed by that paint. For more extreme highlights I then mix that colour with a lighter shade etc.

So, for instance with the Ultramarine here I started with Macragge Blue and washed him with Drakenhof Nightshade. I then line highlighted fairly heavily with Alaitoc Blue and put lines of colour where it looked like more light would fall on the model. For instance on the shoulder pad I added areas of lighter colour on the top and centre. I then highlighted again with Ice Blue on more prominent areas and then used Space Wolves Grey for extreme highlights such as on the very edges of the shoulder pad.

ultramarine highlight

For the Ranger’s coat I used Caliban Green as the base colour. I then washed it with Biel-Tan Green before highlighting it first with Caliban Green, then with a 1:1 blend of Caliban Green and Warpstone Glow, followed by Warpstone Glow and finally extreme highlights of Scorpion Green (Moot Green). I followed the folds of the cloak, starting with very broad strokes, reducing the thickness as I changed colour.

Ranger coat

For me, highlighting does two things. It defines edges, such as those on the Ultramarine’s armour, and adds to the “3D-ness” of the figure by defining upper surfaces caught by light and contrasting with shadier areas such as on the Ranger’s coat.

Undercoating

I don’t always undercoat, the blue-grey colour I use is fine on black as are the silvery metallics. I do undercoat for reds, yellows, brasses/golds and creams/whites as these colours sometimes require multiple coats in order to get an even colour, a base coat reduces the number of layers needed and helps give a flatter colour.

Basecoating

I’m currently using a Chaos Black undercoat on all my models.

Right, so those are the basics. Part 2, where I actually show some Space Wolves, will be up as soon as possible! Sorry for the long wait!

L.o.F.

The Joy of Kitbash part 4: Reposing Limbs

For the penultimate part of this series, I’m going to look at something a bit more complex, reposing limbs. It’s something that I’ve done a few times and it can be very, very frustrating. On the other hand, it gives a unique pose. I have to admit that the example shown here was not my most successful attempt, I used Tactical Marine legs (as that’s what I’ve got at the moment) rather than the running legs available in the Space Wolves Pack kit, and not only is the Tac Marine pose a bit weird it’s a bit of a nightmare to repose as I had to adjust the ankle as well as the knee and hip joints. I suppose that my first bit of advice then is to try to pick a limb (or set of limbs) that is as close in shape to the final pose as possible.

The second thing to look at is the material from which the limb is made. Oddly enough, given its reputation, Finecast is easier to work with than plastic in this case as limited reposing can be done using a hairdryer. All you need to do is heat the limb for about thirty seconds (hairdryers vary so I’d recommend heating then testing every few seconds) before gently bending them to the right shape. I had to repose a set of Shining Spear legs this weekend and it took seconds in order to pose them. If they had been plastic it would either have relied on judicious shaving of limbs and mount or several hours with wire and scalpel and if they had been metal, well, I’d probably have ended up sitting on the floor rocking back and fore trying to figure out how to jam them together.

For this article I’m going to start with reposing legs. I’ve done this a few times now (well, at least four) and it’s fairly straightforward, it just requires a bit of work, some planning and a lot of patience. As I play a Space Marine variant army I’m going to use Marine legs to do this. It should also be possible to do something similar with other races but you’ll need to think about how you’ll model the joints as power armour has convenient corrugated bits at the joints (can’t think of the proper name for them right now). You will need:

  • a set of Tactical Marine legs. Other variants are fine. In fact it’s probably easier to use running legs as I did for my Rune Priest and this Swiftclaw.

unposed legs

  • Green stuff
  • Some fairly stiff wire (~1mm in diameter)
  • A scalpel
  • modelling tool with a pointy end
  • file
  • wire clippers
  • drill bit (slightly wider in diameter than the wire)
  • Super Glue
  • A plaster/bandaid (at least if you’re me)

The first job is to stop and think. I’m serious, honest! Before you cut anything you need to consider what pose you’re planning and how you’re going to do it. Are you just shifting one knee so that the guy is striking a heroic pose or are you going to have to move every joint? Is the pose anatomically possible? I have been known to try and pose heroically on a chair to try and figure out what I’m about to do. Fortunately my boyfriend hasn’t taken any photos as I don’t do heroic particularly well!

The next job is to cut up the set of legs. I use a scalpel rather than a razor saw as it removes less material (if somewhat more finger). If you’re going to be doing a lot of joints, you may want to label them.

reposed legs cut up

Then you need to drill through the cut up pieces. If a piece needs connecting at both ends (such as the thighs of the example), drill all the way through, otherwise drill deep enough into the plastic to hold the wire securely just as you would when pinning.

Then thread the wire through, gluing it in place. Leave enough space at the joints so that you keep the model’s proportions once it is posed. Using wire lets you repose the model a bit, so that you can get it just right.

reposed legs wired

Next up, you need to use green stuff to fill in the joints and tidy up any mess you made when cutting up the model, such as with the ankles on the example legs, which had to be dug out rather than cut cleanly. Please take your time when doing this. Do one joint at a time and wait for it to be set before starting the next one. I’m serious. If you store mixed together green stuff in the freezer it will stay soft for about a day and a half. Simply warm it in your hands for a minute or so before using.

reposed legs greenstuffed

File or sand any rough edges and your reposed legs should be ready to use. I’ve used the same technique to repose arms too.

reposed legs and arms

A simpler way to repose arms is to play with how the limb connects to the body. You can trim and file the joint before filling in any gaps with green stuff. It’s much simpler than making a new joint but is only really suitable if you just want to tweak a pose slightly.

reposed bloodclaw

There’ll be one last post in this series but I need to find the bits, something which is turning out to be harder than I thought.

L.o.F.

500 points Space Wolves versus Orks

I managed to get a game in against my boyfriend the other weekend. We don’t get much time for games, so even a little 500 points game is a refreshing change and, equally unusually, I actually won. This isn’t a proper battle report, I didn’t write everything down, more an exploration of my list and my core units, most of which were in action.

I bought a 500 point Space Wolf list against his Ork Boyz. My list was:

HQ: Wolf Priest on bike
Troops: 5x Grey Hunters, Melta gun
Troops: 5x Grey Hunters, Melta gun
Fast Attack: 4x Swiftclaws
Heavy Support: 5x Long Fangs: 2x Heavy Bolters, 2x Missile launchers
=500 points

While he brought:

HQ: Warboss, Power Klaw, ‘Eavy armour, twin-linked shoota
Troops: 20x Ork Boyz, 2x Big Shoota
Troops: 20x Ork Boyz, 2x Big Shoota
Fast Attack: 3x Deffkoptas, twin linked rokkit launchers
=495 points

We played Purge the Alien with Hammer and Anvil deployment on a 4×4 board. Actually, we rolled Vanguard Strike yet again but I know from experience that it doesn’t work so well on a 4×4 as the deployment zone is too small.

I won the roll off and decided to go first. I decided to play aggressively with my Swiftclaws and drove them towards the Boyz squad with the Warboss while the Grey Hunters shuffled forward six inches. I really wanted to get the Deffkoptas off the board, so I set my Long Fangs on them while the other squads shot at the Boyz.

I’m not particularly tactical, I usually forget something important or place a unit in a daft place. For once I lucked out with the placement though. Playing on a 4×4 meant that my Long Fangs could hit everything and my Grey Hunters could hit something every turn. I was also fairly lucky, or rather my boyfriend was very unlucky, as I was able to kill his Warboss in a challenge before he could hit back. If he’d had better luck with his saving throws, I’d have been in a lot of trouble!

The mixture of missile launchers and heavy bolters worked fairly well for my Long Fangs against an infantry based army mostly due to the rate of fire. I guess that Long Fangs are probably a little bit too powerful for 500 points, as they are fairly cheap for the amount of damage that they can do, however I don’t think that they were crucial this game.

Oddly enough, although Swiftclaws are not the best value for their points cost for Space Wolves, I like them as they do provide a way of getting an assaulty unit across the board very fast and the extra point of toughness comes in very handy. Of course, as Blood Claws, they are only WS and BS 3, but they get an extra attack on the charge and with the very killy Wolf Priest attached to the unit to nullify the Headstrong rule, they are fairly reliable. I need to build and paint another one or two models for larger games, but at 500 points, four bikes are fine. I don’t expect them to last the game, just cause as much chaos as possible before they get killed. They were definitely worth their points this game as they killed a 130 point unit of Ork Boyz and one Swift Claw survived long enough to join the Wolf Priest in an assault on the other Ork Boyz squad along with one of my Grey Hunter squads. The Wolf Priest survived this game and I guess he caused the final blow to the Orks as the last unit fell to his sweeping advance in turn three.

I lost one pack of Grey Hunters in addition to the Swift Claws. However, they played their part, lasting a turn and a bit in close combat with the second squad of Ork Boyz. I think that if I were to tweak this list a little, I might swap out a Melta for a Flamer in future. The Melta guns did practically nothing all game, and if anything, I was penalised by being out of range with them for most of the game. A flamer is still only short range, but it’s a template weapon (meaning that if I’m lucky I can take out more than one guy with one shot) and might be a bit of fun.

It’s a pity that the game only lasted three turns, my boyfriend had some atrocious luck at times, but I think that I’m happy with this list as the core of my army. I didn’t use the Rune Priest as I thought that the Long Fangs would be more useful. In a larger game I’d add in the Rune Priest as a matter of course.

Hopefully I can get a few more 500 points games in and try and see if practice speeds up my playing. A 500 point session is never going to be the most epic of 40K games, but that doesn’t mean that it can’t be great fun and it has the advantage of being small and fast, meaning that in my hectic household, there’s a chance of getting a game in! Hopefully I can get another one in soon as my boyfriend needs his revenge and there are a couple of tweaks that we both want to try.

L.o.F.